When It Comes to Planning and other Important Stuff, Don’t Be Like Trump.

As I mentioned last post, Trump doesn’t much care for planning, or other important stuff. Like moral leadership. Or racial equity (you know, opportunity and justice for all!).

Trump also seems to have missed the memo, that as a general rule, it’s just not a good idea to go around calling other countries *sh*tholes. Or sh*t houses, as “clarified” by to one GOP Senator who I guess thought his comments were actually helpful.

Don’t be like Trump.

Well, not unless you TOO have a day that’s spent mostly watching t.v. and eating cheeseburgers from McDonald’s.

Or you can otherwise schedule loads of Executive Time into your day. 

Hint: #NotMyLife

Soooo… along the way, I became a fan of creating goals and planning how to reach them.  Especially as I was in business.

And I wanted to be taken seriously.

Which in most of Corporate America (and the White House once upon a time) meant  showing up for meetings ON TIME, the expectation that you would set and meet goals, and able to document–during your annual review–that you actually were doing the important work stuff you were getting paid money to do.

For years, I accomplished this by way of the Daytimer, then later Franklin Covey, while coveting Filofax (then later, Moleskine).  When I moved back into “Corporate America” ten years ago, I went the electronic-digital route with Outlook as a base and more recently trying out cloud based tools such as AirTable and Evernote.

Planners-for-Designers-Moleskine

But now, I am flirting with the idea of letting a paper planner back into my life again.

And I am not alone.

Millennials, it turns out, are big buyers of paper planners. For some, like this young writer notes, writing in a paper planner has a “romantic appeal…”  Yes there is the functionality aspect, but compared to digital tools, as she notes: “a paper planner can be an extension of one’s aesthetic. “

Which I totally get, identifying as an aesthete.

Which means, I’m willing to bet that my preference for Filofax and Moleskine back in the day (along with Big Hair and shoulder pads) can probably be traced to romantizing and identifying with Working Girl’s Tess McGill and Katherine Parker.

Since those days, “we’ve come a long way baby.”

Okay,  if we are talking about “breaking the glass ceiling” into the C-suite and board room, maybe not so much.  But when it comes to planners (digital and paper), there are many paper planning tools (however you define “aesthetically pleasing” or not) to choose from.

DailyPlannercopySQ2017
from “14 Planners to Help You Get Your Sh*t Together in 2018” slideshow @  Hollywood Reporter

Even if it’s just for scheduling more “executive time.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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